Shane Goldmacher is a former reporter for Capitol Weekly. He is a graduate of UC Berkeley, where he served as editor of the Berkeley Political Review.

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  • National NAACP bucks CA chapter, backs tobacco tax initiative
  • NAACP's Huffman assailed for tobacco, telecom payments
  • Schwarzenegger targets the 'ElimiDate Voter'
  • Legislators tap Sacramento interests for campaign cash
  • New York developer's eminent-domain crusade comes to California
  • Schwarzenegger's election-year olive branches
  • Dems, Gov. tapped same spots for campaign cash
  • Schwarzenegger has a special interest in Capitol-area money
  • Schwarzenegger's million-dollar woman
  • The kings and queens of the California political quotation
  • All about Phil: Angelides is strategist in own campaign
  • "Women of the year" married to men of Legislature
  • With new law, chase for campaign cash becomes family affair
  • High school student gives governor $44,600
  • Going to interview with CTA? Be sure to look into the camera
  • David Crane: Arnold's other Democratic adviser
  • The rise of the blogs: How the GOP uses the Web to organize




  • 1A: 76.9-23.1
    1B: 61.3-38.7
    1C: 57.4-42.6
    1D: 56.6-43.4
    1E: 64-36
    83: 70.6-29.4
    84: 53.7-46.3
    85: 45.9-54.1
    86: 48-52
    87: 45.2-54.8
    88: 23-77
    89: 25.5-74.5
    90: 47.6-52.4

    U.S. Sen.
    Feinstein 59.7
    Mountjoy 34.9
    Gov.
    Schwarzenegger 55.8
    Angelides 39.2
    Lt. Gov
    Garamendi 49.5
    McClintock 44.9
    Atty. Gen.
    Brown 56.7
    Poochigian 37.9
    Sec. of state
    Bowen 48.5
    McPherson 44.7
    Treasurer
    Lockyer 54.8
    Parrish 37
    Controller
    Chiang 50.9
    Strickland 40.1
    Insur. Comm.
    Poizner 50.7
    Bustamante 38.9

    For complete election results click here.


    Gov.
    Angelides 48.2
    Westly 43.1
    Lt. Gov
    Garamendi 42.9
    Speier 39.3
    Figueroa 17.8
    Atty. Gen.
    Brown 63.2
    Delgadillo 36.8
    Sec. of state
    Bowen 61.1
    Ortiz 38.9
    Treasurer
    Parrish 56.4
    Richman 43.6
    Controller
    Democratic primary
    Chiang 53.4
    Dunn 46.6
    Republican primary
    Strickland 40.9
    Maldonado 36.9
    Insur. Comm.
    Bustamante 70.5
    Kraft 29.5
    Supt. of Schools
    O'Connell 52.5, avoids run-off

    For complete election results click here.


    73: 47.4-52.6
    74: 45-55
    75: 46.6-53.4
    76: 38-62
    77: 40.5-59.5
    78: 41.5-58.5
    79: 38.9-61.1
    80: 34.3-65.7

    For complete election results click here.


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    Wednesday, November 02, 2005

    Top Donors

    The Chronicle's John Wildermuth takes on the mammoth task of compiling the top donors in the $300 million special election. Here is his list.

    -- California Teachers Association (Oppose Props. 74, 75, 76, 77): $56.6 million
    -- California State Council of Service Employees (Oppose Props. 74, 75, 76, 77): $16.1 million
    -- Pfizer (Support Prop. 78): $9.9 million
    -- GlaxoSmithKline (Support Prop. 78): $9.8 million
    -- Johnson & Johnson (Support Prop. 78): $9.8 million
    -- Merck & Co (Support Prop. 78): $9.8 million
    -- Arnold Schwarzenegger (Support Props. 74, 75, 76, 77): $7.25 million
    -- Amgen (Support Prop. 78): $4.7 millio
    -- Abbott Laboratories (Support Prop. 78): $4.6 million
    -- Bristol-Myers Squibb (Support Prop. 78): $4.5 million
    -- Novartis Pharmaceuticals (Support Prop. 78): $4.5 million
    -- Aventis Pharmaceuticals (Support Prop. 78): $4.5 million
    -- Wyeth (Support Prop. 78): $4.5 million
    -- Eli Lilly (Support Prop. 78): $4.5 million
    -- Stephen Bing, producer (Oppose Prop. 77): $4.5 million
    -- SEIU Local 1000 (Oppose Props. 74, 75, 76, 77): $4.1 million
    -- William Robinson, former DHL owner (Support Props. 74, 75, 76, 77): $3.75 million
    -- California Federation of Teachers (Oppose Props. 74, 75, 76, 77): $3.6 million
    -- California Correctional Peace Officers Association (Oppose Props. 74, 75, 76, 77): $3.5 million
    -- Alex Spanos, Stockton developer (Support Props. 74, 75, 76, 77): $3.25 million
    -- Jerry Perenchio, Univision CEO (Support Props 74, 75, 76, 77): $3 million
    -- PACE of California School Employees (Oppose Props 74, 75, 76, 77): $2.1 million
    -- Constellation Energy Group (Oppose Prop. 80): $1.3 million
    -- California Professional Firefighters (Oppose Props 74, 75, 76, 77): $1.3 million
    -- Steve Poizner, Silicon Valley executive (Support Prop. 77): $1.25 million
    -- Voter Registration and Education Fund (Oppose Prop. 77): $1.1 million
    -- Wal-Mart Stores and family (Support Props. 74, 75, 76, 77): $1 million
    -- Small Business Action Committee (Support Prop. 76): $1 million
    -- Association of California School Administrators (Oppose Props. 74, 75, 76, 77): $1 million

    Comments on "Top Donors"

     

    Anonymous AP Gov't Teacher said ... (11:16 AM) : 

    It never ceases to amaze me that my union which is famous for arguing that all teachers are underpaid (and certainly some of us are) can raise $56 million for an election. Perhaps we wouldn't be quite so poor if they'd quit imposing dues increases on us in order to support the status quo.

    I for one, will be voting for Prop 74, 75, and 77. I am not sure about 76, but something needs to allow greater flexibility for our legislators. I do not fear more flexiblity in Prop 98 (as would occur with Prop 76). The fact is, politicians in Sacramento have refused or been reluctant to build school finances into the base budget for schools because it escalates future state spending automatically. The bottom line is if we had competitive districts legislators could either vote to fund education (a public priority) or not - and then the voters would either reelect incumbents or not. Wow - isn't that how the design was intended?

    As for Prop 77, the redistricting initiative: I teach my AP Gov't students about gerrymandering and while I used to focus most of the discussion on the great Phil Burton gerrymander; I now use our most recent redistricting as an example of how self-interst can obscure basic electoral integrity.

    The lesson is great for discussing federalism (Reeps support gerrymander to maintain House majority - Dems for State Leg purposes); cross-cutting cleavages (conservatives support horrible gerrymander to maintain their own seats - liberals like it so they maintain the majority). I guess if we fix the system I'll have to go back to historical examples, but at least California won't suffer under a horribly crafted gerrymander.

    Prop 74 (tenure); other than the hassle of probably more "scham observations" by our administrators, this reform is good for quality teachers. More importantly it's good for potentially quality teachers because it extends the time an administrator can work with a young teacher before the decision must be made to make him or her a pemanent employee. Under the current system - a teacher gets one and a half school years to prove he or she is worth the risk. Four years will buy more time for honest development and create less passing around of "potentials."

     

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