Shane Goldmacher is a former reporter for Capitol Weekly. He is a graduate of UC Berkeley, where he served as editor of the Berkeley Political Review.

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  • National NAACP bucks CA chapter, backs tobacco tax initiative
  • NAACP's Huffman assailed for tobacco, telecom payments
  • Schwarzenegger targets the 'ElimiDate Voter'
  • Legislators tap Sacramento interests for campaign cash
  • New York developer's eminent-domain crusade comes to California
  • Schwarzenegger's election-year olive branches
  • Dems, Gov. tapped same spots for campaign cash
  • Schwarzenegger has a special interest in Capitol-area money
  • Schwarzenegger's million-dollar woman
  • The kings and queens of the California political quotation
  • All about Phil: Angelides is strategist in own campaign
  • "Women of the year" married to men of Legislature
  • With new law, chase for campaign cash becomes family affair
  • High school student gives governor $44,600
  • Going to interview with CTA? Be sure to look into the camera
  • David Crane: Arnold's other Democratic adviser
  • The rise of the blogs: How the GOP uses the Web to organize

  • 1A: 76.9-23.1
    1B: 61.3-38.7
    1C: 57.4-42.6
    1D: 56.6-43.4
    1E: 64-36
    83: 70.6-29.4
    84: 53.7-46.3
    85: 45.9-54.1
    86: 48-52
    87: 45.2-54.8
    88: 23-77
    89: 25.5-74.5
    90: 47.6-52.4

    U.S. Sen.
    Feinstein 59.7
    Mountjoy 34.9
    Schwarzenegger 55.8
    Angelides 39.2
    Lt. Gov
    Garamendi 49.5
    McClintock 44.9
    Atty. Gen.
    Brown 56.7
    Poochigian 37.9
    Sec. of state
    Bowen 48.5
    McPherson 44.7
    Lockyer 54.8
    Parrish 37
    Chiang 50.9
    Strickland 40.1
    Insur. Comm.
    Poizner 50.7
    Bustamante 38.9

    For complete election results click here.

    Angelides 48.2
    Westly 43.1
    Lt. Gov
    Garamendi 42.9
    Speier 39.3
    Figueroa 17.8
    Atty. Gen.
    Brown 63.2
    Delgadillo 36.8
    Sec. of state
    Bowen 61.1
    Ortiz 38.9
    Parrish 56.4
    Richman 43.6
    Democratic primary
    Chiang 53.4
    Dunn 46.6
    Republican primary
    Strickland 40.9
    Maldonado 36.9
    Insur. Comm.
    Bustamante 70.5
    Kraft 29.5
    Supt. of Schools
    O'Connell 52.5, avoids run-off

    For complete election results click here.

    73: 47.4-52.6
    74: 45-55
    75: 46.6-53.4
    76: 38-62
    77: 40.5-59.5
    78: 41.5-58.5
    79: 38.9-61.1
    80: 34.3-65.7

    For complete election results click here.

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    Tuesday, June 27, 2006

    Cable bill up for hearing today

    Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez will present his cable measure to Senate policy committee this morning. The hearing is expected to be quite long, with a gaggle of consultanta and lobbying types surrounding the hearing room. Republican Sen. Dave Cox said yesterday that in the last 30 days he has had at least 100 advocates shuttle in and out of his office on the measure.

    In anycase, a new wrinkle in the cable debate is AT&T's new privacy policy.

    On Tuesday, the Senate utilities committee will consider legislation to drastically expand telephone companies' access to California's lucrative video- and Internet-services market.

    But AT&T, the state's leading phone company, recently overhauled its privacy policy--a move that may cast a long shadow over the hearing. Consumer advocates say AT&T's new privacy rules open the door for the company to share personal data--such as the Web sites that customers visit and the TV shows they watch--with government officials.

    The pending bill, AB 2987 by Assembly Speaker Fabian Núñez, D-Los Angeles, would create a state-issued franchise for phone companies wishing to enter the video-services market, the very service that AT&T announced privacy-policy amendments for last week.

    Under the new policy, AT&T declared that a customer's viewing information is the property of AT&T--not the customer.

    "While your Account Information may be personal to you, these records constitute business records that are owned by AT&T," reads the policy. "As such, AT&T may disclose such records to protect its legitimate business interests, safeguard others, or respond to legal process."

    Consumers and civil-liberties groups have blasted the new policy, arguing that it gives the company carte blanche to share private consumer data.

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